Review: Under the Lights (The Field Party #2) by Abbi Glines

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In the follow-up to Abbi Glines’s #1 New York Times bestseller Until Friday Night—which bestselling author Kami Garcia called “tender, honest, and achingly real”—three teens from a small southern town are stuck in a dramatic love triangle.

Willa can’t erase the bad decisions of her past that led her down the path she’s on now. But she can fight for forgiveness from her family. And she can protect herself by refusing to let anyone else get close to her.

High school quarterback and town golden boy Brady used to be the best of friends with Willa—she even had a crush on him when they were kids. But that’s all changed now: her life choices have made her a different person from the girl he used to know.

Gunner used to be friends with Willa and Brady, too. He too is larger than life and a high school football star—not to mention that his family basically owns the town of Lawton. He loves his life, and doesn’t care about anyone except himself. But Willa is the exception—and he understands the girl she’s become in a way no one else can.

As secrets come to light and hearts are broken, these former childhood friends must face the truth about growing up and falling in love…even if it means losing each other forever.

Screen Shot 2015-03-27 at 12.53.20 AM3.5 stars

This review may contain spoilers.

I liked this book because it was a quick and entertaining read. Willa has a past that almost wrecked her. She’s doing everything she can to make her Nonna proud. Her Nonna is the only person who loves her and cares for her. She has to prove to her Nonna that she is trustworthy.

Gunner’s parents did not like him at all. He basically grew up without love in his life. When he finds out about the family secrets, his life took a turn for the worse. He felt like Willa was the only one who could understand him. Him, Brady, and Willa were childhood friends. Brady and Gunner aren’t as close as they were in the past, so Willa was the only person who he could confide in.

I didn’t think this book was a love triangle. Sure Brady liked Willa, but he doesn’t really do anything about it. He kept saying he wanted to leave Ivy so he could be with Willa, but he never did. He has his own chapters, and when I read them, I didn’t really feel like his feelings for her were strong. It’s like he just had a crush on her, and he wanted to be with her because he thought that they would be good together. Meh. I also didn’t get how Brady was the “nice guy” everyone was saying he was. He’s not even that nice. Maybe it’s just me. Gunner wasn’t exactly that nice either. I get that he grew up with shitty parents, but that doesn’t excuse the way he treated women. Can we also talk about the majority of the girls in this book? They were all bitches that threw themselves at football players that did not give a damn about them. Willa and Maggie were the only girls who were nice, and they didn’t even become best friends. Kinda depressing to read.

That ending was disappointing. I needed more. I didn’t even see Gunner and Willa as a real couple. I wanted to read about them being all lovey dovey and holding hands in school. Yeah, that didn’t happen. “I love you, Willa”. Bam, the end. I didn’t even get an epilogue.

I hope the next book will be better. Please let there be nicer girls that the female protagonist could be best friends with. I have a feeling that Brady is next. I hope he fixes his attitude. I got tired of hearing him talk about how dependable and nice he was. Talk about conceited.

Why 3.5 stars then? I’m a pretty easy reader to please. I did enjoy this book despite all its flaws, and I guess I just have my own rating system. I feel like I’m always explaining why I rate books higher than people expect me to rate them because of all the flaws I point out in my reviews. I don’t know how to explain it to all of you haha!

GOODREADS | AMAZON

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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